Merry Christology or Happy Heresy? Trinitarian Heresies

This is the third and final installment of the Christmas series on Christological heresies. I hope you have found these helpful in understanding what not to believe about the incarnation. The following heresies technically deserve a category of their own. They transcend the more narrow study of Christology, and are more closely related to the Continue Reading

Merry Christmas or Happy Heresy? The Hypostatic Union

Continuing our Christmas/Incarnation series on Christological heresies, we come to what is perhaps the most complicated of these issues: the Hypostatic union. Many ancient heresies were rejected for what they believed about how the human and the divine met on Christmas night 2,000 years ago. Was Jesus a demi-god, part man, part God? Was Jesus Continue Reading

Merry Christology or Happy Heresy? The God Before Bethlehem

Christology The theological event celebrated at Christmas is the Incarnation, when the Word took on flesh and became in every way human, calling us His brothers. With this, the Word taking on human form, comes the ever important necessity to then understand, from Scripture, what this means. The incarnation is crucial in answering Jesus’ famous Continue Reading

Dan Mohler on Job pt. I

In this episode, I begin a refutation of Dan Mohler’s view of sovereignty, specifically in the book of Job. I also recommend the song “Blessed Be Your Name.” My computer was running slowly, and I tried a new recording method, so I apologize for any sound glitches in the audio. https://resistingthewinds.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/Dan-Mohler-on-Job-pt.-I.mp3Podcast: Play in new window Continue Reading

Responding to Supernatural Part I: Sovereignty with a Chest

Introduction: I recently finished Dr. Michael Heiser’s book Supernatural. It has been recommended by a good friend, as well as a trusted pastor. After finishing the book, I had conflicting emotions. The book has many positive qualities. I would say the primary thesis of the book is largely established. The book is a challenge to Continue Reading